Breaking News: Bonsai Empire’s Intermediate Course

What follows is a brief review of the new Intermediate Course, a solid educational opportunity freshly available from Bonsai Empire.

bonsai-intermediate-course.JPG

I’ll get to my review in a second, please forgive me for offering some general comments about bonsai study first. All content being equal, if one were to sketch out a ‘utility-meter’ based on the actual usefulness of the method of bonsai study, from best to worst, it would run like this:

  1. In-person study
  2. Videos
  3. Blogs
  4. Books

Videos rank pretty high in teaching about physical activities. As many do not have the opportunity to study bonsai in person with an expert, either because of logistics or finances, videos are really the next best thing.

Bonsai Empire has chosen to offer highly produced and accurate bonsai information using the skills and knowledge of Bjorn Bjorholm. Many of you bought the Beginner Course, which was a smash hit, and this is a continuation of that. ‘Lord of the Rings’ fans will appreciate the gold-morphing text in the opening frames, although the absence of swordplay throughout will remind one that this is, actually, a bonsai video. Detailed classification, care commentary, and progressions from unworked bonsai through to finished work are offered in learning bursts from mini-videos. Examples centering on older, developed bonsai so rarely seen in the West is one of the Intermediate Course’s cardinal virtues. It’s a well-made and thoughtfully produced learning tool, far above standard YouTube fare, and delivers on the promise of deepening the information from the first Beginner Course.

My friend Jonas Dupuich of Bonsai Tonight has written a far more extensive review, which is excellent: https://bonsaitonight.com/2016/06/14/review-bonsai-intermediate-course/

Or go right to the Intermediate Course:  http://www.bonsaiempire.com/courses

3 Comments

  1. carterbeall says:

    How is this different than Bjorn Bjorholm’s Bonsai Art of Japan series?

  2. Ray Norris says:

    i agree that video is handy if no hands on courses are avail to you. Going to hands on courses is the best as you can ask questions and first class advice.
    I have studied with Michael Hagedorn and came away with the best understanding of Bonsai techniques and health of trees

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: